GIVEAWAY!

It is now the last day of the year and that means GIVEAWAY!

Don’t forget to follow me on Instagram and on Facebook during the “Christmas in Sweden” month for a chance to get one of four giveaway books with Swedish recipes on December 31. I will pick 2 followers on Instagram and 2 on Facebook on January 1 (in the evening, due to time differences around the world) and send you one of the books. If you are wondering what “Christmas in Sweden” is all about check out my previous posts here.🎁🎉🎊

So here is what you have to do:

Follow me on Instagram or Facebook and make a comment telling me where you are from and what your favorite meal to cook is. I will check that you are a follower when picking the comments.

Simple as that! Then on the evening of January 1 (Swedish time), I will contact you via PM if your comment gets picked and publish it here and on Instagram and Facebook. Make sure to check your inbox!

Peach cheesecake

Peach cheesecake
Print Recipe
This easy no bake peach cheesecake recipe is so rich and creamy. Made with simple ingredients. Perfect peaches and cream dessert!
Servings Prep Time
10 people 20 minutes
Passive Time
12 hours
Servings Prep Time
10 people 20 minutes
Passive Time
12 hours
Peach cheesecake
Print Recipe
This easy no bake peach cheesecake recipe is so rich and creamy. Made with simple ingredients. Perfect peaches and cream dessert!
Servings Prep Time
10 people 20 minutes
Passive Time
12 hours
Servings Prep Time
10 people 20 minutes
Passive Time
12 hours
Ingredients
BOTTOM CRUST
  • 1.5 cups graham crackers / digestive biscuits crushed
  • 1/4 cup brown sugar
  • 7 tbsp melted butter
CHEESECAKE
  • 8 ounces cream cheese
  • 3 cups whipping cream (eg. cool whip)
  • 1 cup powdered sugar
  • 1/3 cup white chocolate (melted)
  • 1/3 cup diced peaches
TOPPING
  • 29 ounces canned peaches (save the liquid from the can, about 1/2 cup)
  • 1/2 cup water (optional)
  • 4 sheets gelatin (optional)
Servings: people
Instructions
  1. THE BOTTOM/CRUST: In a mixing bowl, add the graham cracker/ digestive crumbs and brown sugar and mix everything roughly with a fork. Add melted butter and mix everything until your have a coarse mixture. Dump the cookie mixture into a 6 or 8 inch spring form pan. Press it down tightly, using the flat base of a drinking glass. Chill the crust in the fridge for 1 hour or until it becomes hard.
  2. PEACH CHEESECAKE: In a mixing bowl, add cream cheese and whipped cream and mix until thoroughly combined. Add powdered sugar and mix again. Add melted white chocolate and mix until you have a smooth and creamy mixture. Gently stir in the 1/3 cup of small peach pieces. Spoon this mixture on top of the graham cracker crust. Refrigerate this cake overnight or at least 12 hours (until the cheesecake layer sets).
  3. PEACH TOPPING: *After the cake has been in the fridge for about 12 hours* Slice the 29 ounces of peaches thinly (about 5 mm) and spread them in a pattern on top of the cheesecake.
  4. This is optional, if you do not want to put gelatin on top leave this last step out! Soak the gelatin sheets for 5 minutes in cold water, then take them out, squeeze ut the water from them. Put water, peach liquid from can and gelatin in a saucepan and heat up gently until the gelatin has dissolved. Let it cool a little bit and keep stirring, then pour it over the sliced peaches so they are covered. Then put in the fridge for about 30-60 minutes until it has set. It is then ready to be served!

December 24 – Christmas Eve!

MERRY CHRISTMAS!!

It is now finally Christmas Eve here in Sweden and we are celebrating all day long! Christmas has arrived in Sweden!

At exactly 3 PM, half of Sweden sits down in front of the television for a family viewing of the 1958 Walt Disney Presents Christmas special, “From All of Us to All of You.” Or as it is known in Sverige, “Kalle Anka och hans vänner önskar God Jul” (Donald Duck and his friends wish you a Merry Christmas).

This program has been airing without commercial interruption at the same time on Christmas Eve since 1960. The show consists of Jiminy Cricket presenting about a dozen Disney cartoons from the ’30s, ’40s, ’50s, and ’60s, only a couple of which have anything to do with Christmas. There are “Silly Symphonies” shorts and clips from films like Cinderella, Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs, and The Jungle Book. The special is pretty much the same every year, except for the live introduction by a host (who plays the role of Walt Disney from the original Walt Disney Presents series) and the annual addition of one new snippet from the latest Disney-produced movie.

When we finished watching Donald Duck the food is served.

Julbord, the “Christmas table”, it’s basically a smörgåsbord with typical Swedish food on it. The table is filled with different bread, cheeses, butter, potatoes, Christmas ham (the ham is first boiled and then glazed with a mixture of egg, breadcrumbs and mustard), eggs, meat balls, pigs feet, salmon, herring, small hotdogs, roasted pork, warm potato casserole, matchstick potatoes layered with cream, onion and sprats called Janssons frestelse (“Jansson’s Temptation”), home-made liver paté, wort-flavoured rye bread (vörtbröd) and it just continues.

Lutfisk, lyed fish made with dried ling or cod, served with boiled potato, thick white sauce and green peas can be served with the warm dishes or as a separate course. Lutfisk is often served as dinner the second day after the traditional Christmas Yule-table dinner.

Julbord desserts include rice pudding sprinkled with cinnamon powder. Traditionally, an almond is hidden in the bowl of rice pudding and whoever finds it receives a small prize or is recognized for having good luck. Lots of chocolates and other sweets is consumed in large quantities.

Beer and julmust ( a very sweet carbonated soda that could be described like something of a mix between Root Beer and Coca-Cola.) and the occasional snaps are common beverages to this Christmas meal. Mulled wine “glögg” is a very common drink and tastes very sweet, raisins and different nuts and saffron buns are served throughout December.

Once the food has been eaten it is time for gifts! Santa comes knocking on the door and ask if there are any good children in the house and if they ate all their vegetables. If they did (and of course they did!) he gives them presents. When the presents have been given we usually start to relax. The kids are playing with their new toys and the adults enjoy their coffee and sweets. For the rest of the evening it will be filled with joy, laughter, more food and relaxation.

How do you spend your Christmas

December 23 – The night before Christmas

December 23 – The night before Christmas

It is the day before Christmas Eve here in Sweden and almost everything is done. Traditionally, families get together to decorate the tree on this day. The last food is being cooked and presents are being wrapped  When the tree is finished and all is set for the big day tomorrow the family gathers in the living room in the evening and relax in front of the TV and watches “Uppesittarkväll” which is a Christmas wake that traditionally consists of a longer studio program with guests and various entertainment, possibly with a break for other programs. Usually featured in the program are live bands, Christmas related tips, viewing contests and a panel of invited guests who write Christmas presents rhymes at the viewers’ request. Often this is the first time the Christmas ham is being eaten, on a slice on bread with some mustard on it.

Now we just wait for tomorrow and relax. How do you spend the day before Christmas?

December 22 – Christmas ham

It’s often served cold and is the centerpiece of a Swedish Christmas table. We normally boil the ham and then finish it in the oven with a mustard and breadcrumb crust/glaze but these days most Swedes probably buy a ham that has already been boiled and then they simply glaze it at home.

Once the glaze is cooked the ham is moved to somewhere cold, usually outside, to cool as quickly as possible. The idea is that this will trap the juices in to ensure that the ham remains moist and tasty.

The ham is usually sliced thinly and served with a selection of mustard and bread.

How to make your own mustard glaze for a 6-8 pound ham:

* 1 egg yolk
* 1 tsp sugar
* 2 tbs whole grain mustard
* ½ cup breadcrumbs
* 2 tbs honey

Whisk together an egg yolk with sugar, honey and mustard. Brush it on the Christmas ham all around. Sprinkle a layer of breadcrumbs over the ham and pat it to the sides to attach it to the glaze.

Put in the middle of the oven (preheat it first) at 250°C/ 450°F for 5-10 minutes or until it has a nice lightly brownish color. Watch closely so it doesn’t burn.

That’s it! Eat cold, in thin slices. Will keep well in the fridge for quite a while, wrapped in foil.

December 21 – Fish

We are getting closer and closer to Christmas Eve, only 3 more days!

Salmon on the Christmas table is a must for many. Classic dill-cured salmon, salmon paté and gravlax  (that prepares by being chilled in a mixture of salt and sugar for a few days. Dill or herb spices can also be added for the sake of taste and appearance).


Picture: arla.se

Lutfisk is a notorious Swedish Christmas dish and another remnant of the fasting tradition. It was common fare during the Christmas fast when meat was replaced by fish at a time when fresh fish was hard to come by.


Picture: jultradition.se

The dried ling was alternately soaked in water and lye to make it edible again (although some people would say that doesn’t help). Slathering it with a white sauce, melted butter, and even ground mustard in the southern part of Sweden helps to make the gelatinous, reconstituted fish more palatable.

And of course we have the pickled herring.

To put the herring into a layer of salt, vinegar and spices is a way to conserve the fish, or curing. Most cured herring uses a two-step curing process. Initially, herring is cured with salt to extract water. The second stage involves removing the salt and adding flavorings, typically a vinegar, salt, sugar solution to which ingredients such as peppercorn, bay leaves and raw onions are added. In recent years, other flavors have also been added, due to foreign influences. However, the tradition is still strong in Sweden and onion, sherry, mustard and dill are some of the traditional flavorings.

December 20 – Black currant marinated ribs

Ribs is also a classic Christmas food. No Swedish Christmas table is without it.


Black currant marinated ribs
Print Recipe
The ribs gets really nice and tender if you let them lie overnight in this tasteful black currant marinade. Serve them at the Christmas buffet or as Sunday dinner with potato potatoes and a good salad.
Servings Prep Time
8 servings 5 minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
1-2 hours 24 hours
Servings Prep Time
8 servings 5 minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
1-2 hours 24 hours
Black currant marinated ribs
Print Recipe
The ribs gets really nice and tender if you let them lie overnight in this tasteful black currant marinade. Serve them at the Christmas buffet or as Sunday dinner with potato potatoes and a good salad.
Servings Prep Time
8 servings 5 minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
1-2 hours 24 hours
Servings Prep Time
8 servings 5 minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
1-2 hours 24 hours
Ingredients
  • 3.5 pound ribs
  • 2 tbs white wine vinegar
  • 1 cup blackcurrant juice
  • 2 tsp grated ginger
  • 3 tbs honey
Servings: servings
Instructions
  1. Mix honey, vinegar, black currant juice and ginger. Put the ribs in double freezer bags, pour in the marinade, tie the bags and massage around the marinade. Let the meat marinate for about 1 day in the fridge. Turn the bag occasionally.
  2. The next day: Preheat the oven at 175°C / 347°F.
  3. Pour marinade into a saucepan and boil until reduced about half. Place the ribs with the bone side up in an oven-proof form. Put the ribs in the oven until the inside temperature of the ribs is about 85°C / 185°F for about 1.5 to 2 hours. Turn the ribs occasionally and brush with the marinade towards the end.